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"Let them say that we are, indeed, an exceptional people, in love with liberty despite famine killing us slowly."

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The Jesuits Massacre Case

grabyourmaskanddontbelate:

When I have more time, I’ll write a more profound article, as this is one of the crimes that I consider unforgivable and, in light of the recent events that have been happening in El Salvador (the extrajudicial burning of the archives of the NGO that investigates cases of missing children during the war, the closing of the offices of catholic Tutela Legal (Legal Aid) that archives cases of human rights abuse during the war), and considering that yesterday was the 24th anniversary of the massacre, and this week was the 24th anniversary of the final offensive of the war, I want to leave a bit of information here.

(Source: elrastrodetusangreenlanieve)

Filed under jesuits massacre El Salvador: recent history

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guatepolitics:



They may ask who we are, or who were were. We are 17, according to the Forensic Anthropology Team of the Legal Medicine Institute of El Salvador, which now has custody of us. 32 years ago we lived in a small village, hidden among the northern mountains of Morazán, in the east of El Salvador. Our house, protected by bark, was at the foot of a hill called La Cruz. You have to see it: it is a beautiful place. In December 1981, below that hill, they killed us. They massacred almost everyone in El Mozote. We are 17 of a thousand victims. Around 400 of us were killed here and another 600 in nearby villages.
Almost 32 years later, there are those who claim that we must have deserved what happened to us. Others, that “we shouldn’t stir up the past” because this would rob peace from the country. We want to say, first, that we were not guerrillas. In fact, two of us were not even old enough to load a gun. One is even smaller than a rifle. In the second place, what peace are they talking about? Can our families have peace? As the Supreme Court studies if the Amnesty Law is constitutional, we would like to give our opinion. It cannot be that everyone speaks for us and for our families, those who made the war, those who killed us. We were killed, burned, burned, hidden and forgotten. And those who killed us claim that we, for the sake of peace, already forgave them. If we were deprived of life, can we speak?

(Photos: Daniel Valencia, writing translated from the Spanish by guatepolitics)

guatepolitics:

They may ask who we are, or who were were. We are 17, according to the Forensic Anthropology Team of the Legal Medicine Institute of El Salvador, which now has custody of us. 32 years ago we lived in a small village, hidden among the northern mountains of Morazán, in the east of El Salvador. Our house, protected by bark, was at the foot of a hill called La Cruz. You have to see it: it is a beautiful place. In December 1981, below that hill, they killed us. They massacred almost everyone in El Mozote. We are 17 of a thousand victims. Around 400 of us were killed here and another 600 in nearby villages.

Almost 32 years later, there are those who claim that we must have deserved what happened to us. Others, that “we shouldn’t stir up the past” because this would rob peace from the country. We want to say, first, that we were not guerrillas. In fact, two of us were not even old enough to load a gun. One is even smaller than a rifle. In the second place, what peace are they talking about? Can our families have peace? As the Supreme Court studies if the Amnesty Law is constitutional, we would like to give our opinion. It cannot be that everyone speaks for us and for our families, those who made the war, those who killed us. We were killed, burned, burned, hidden and forgotten. And those who killed us claim that we, for the sake of peace, already forgave them. If we were deprived of life, can we speak?

(Photos: Daniel Valencia, writing translated from the Spanish by guatepolitics)

(Source: elfaro.net)

Filed under el mozote vivir para no olvidar el salvador el salvador: recent history

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jopara:

julialf:

Let’s talk about Prudencia Ayala.

Prudencia Ayala was a woman born in 1885 to a native family in a small town in El Salvador, Central America.

She started going to school at age 10, but had to left her studies because her family was too poor to sustain her, so she became a seamstress. She was an autodidact, and taught herself to read politics and economics, until she developed an opinion. Since 1913 she began publishing articles on feminism and anti-imperialism. She was opposed the dictatorships in Latin America, the North American interventions, and proclaimed the necessity of Central America to join into a federal Republic. 

She tried to be a presidential candidate in 1930, even though women couldn’t vote in El Salvador by then. Her government plan included many feminist points, a law to support syndicates, and the legal recognition of illegitimate children. She entered an intellectual and legal fight to be allowed to be a candidate but the Supreme Court resolved against her.

Prudencia retired from politics after that, and until her death, six years later, she worked closely with workers groups and social movements.

Women couldn’t vote in El Salvador until 1950.

Sorry, I couldn’t provide a source in English, but you can read a bit more about here in Spanish here: http://museo.com.sv/2010/11/biografia-prudencia-ayala-la-hija-de-la-centella/ 

i don’t like the sentence on how women weren’t allowed to vote until 1950 like that’s outrageous.

pretty sure even though the 15th amendment and the 19th amendment which said that the right to vote wouldn’t be based on race or gender, women of color didn’t have the right to vote until 1964

It’s outrageous that WoC couldn’t vote until 1964 but still, I don’t think that makes any better that here, in El Salvador, we didn’t have the right to vote until 1950. 

In my opinion, any kind of discrimination is outrageous. Maybe not equally outrageous, but must be pointed out, anyways.

 

Thanks a lot for taking the time to read this completely, really :)

(Source: elrastrodetusangreenlanieve)

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A bit of local history.

julialf:

Today I bring you an account of one of the largest massacres in the recent history of Latin America, featuring the army of my country, the Reagan administration, and 1000 innocent peasants. It happened in December, 1981, and this account was built from the testimony of some survivors and field investigation, and was written by Mark Danner.

Warnings for war violence and general brutality apply.

http://www.markdanner.com/articles/show/the_truth_of_el_mozote

(Source: elrastrodetusangreenlanieve)